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New COVID-19 Compliance Updates

Updated: Tuesday, May 26, 2020

(3 - 5 minute read)

The latest COVID-19 industry updates for businesses to stay compliant with federal health standards.

Legal Disclaimer: 

The information contained in the documents does not constitute legal advice and should not be applied arbitrarily to other businesses or workplaces. Axios HR bears no responsibility with respect to third party reliance on the recommendations set out herein. All employers should consult with local legal counsel, medical as well as health & safety advisors specific to their jurisdiction and industry in developing strategies applicable to their unique workplaces.

Update: May 26, 2020

Outpatient health-care facilities, including clinics, primary care physician offices, or dental offices, and also including veterinary clinics, must:

  • a. Post signs at entrance(s) instructing patients to wear a face covering when inside.
  • b. Limit waiting-area occupancy to the number of individuals who can be present while staying six feet away from one another and ask patients, if possible, to wait in cars for their appointment to be called.
  • c. Mark waiting rooms to enable six feet of social distancing (e.g., by placing X’s on the ground and/or removing seats in the waiting room).
  • d. Enable contactless sign-in (e.g., sign in on phone app) as soon as practicable.
  • e. Add special hours for highly vulnerable patients, including the elderly and those with chronic conditions.
  • f. Conduct a common screening protocol for all patients, including a temperature check and questions about COVID-19 symptoms.
  • g. Place hand sanitizer and face coverings at patient entrance(s).
  • h. Require employees to make proper use of personal protective equipment in accordance with guidance from the CDC and the U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration.
  • i. Require patients to wear a face covering when in the facility, except as necessary for identification or to facilitate an examination or procedure.
  • j. Install physical barriers at sign-in, temperature screening, or other service points that normally require personal interaction (e.g., plexiglass, cardboard, tables).
  • k. Employ telehealth and telemedicine to the greatest extent possible.
  • l. Limit the number of appointments to maintain social distancing and allow adequate time between appointments for cleaning.
  • m. Employ specialized procedures for patients with high temperatures or respiratory symptoms (e.g., special entrances, having them wait in their car) to avoid exposing other patients in the waiting room.
  • n. Deep clean examination rooms after patients with respiratory symptoms and clean rooms between all patients.
  • o. Establish procedures for building disinfection in accordance with CDC guidance if it is suspected that an employee or patient has COVID-19 or if there is a confirmed case.

An Overview Of The Current Scenario

At Axios HR we remain committed to putting people first. During this time we understand how important it is to protect your employees and your organization. We are offering consultations on how to develop a COVID-19 Preparedness and Response Plan for responding to and recovering from impacts to your organization and employees. For more information on how to develop a COVID-19 Response Plan, see our article here. To quickly develop a compliant response plan by working directly with Axios HR, click Contact Us below.

At Axios HR we remain committed to putting people first. During this time we understand how important it is to protect your employees and your organization. Because we are operating in unprecedented times we are providing a Preparedness and Response Plan template (separate document) to serve as a resource guide for planning for, responding to and recovering from a pandemic impacting your organization and employees. The plan takes into account the information provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the State of Michigan (SOM). 

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, OSHA released a worker exposure risk hierarchy based on occupational risk, assessing the workers need to come within 6 feet of individuals who are confirmed or suspected to have COVID-19. Determine your organizations risk category and access how to increase hygiene practices, social distancing, teleconferences, and work from home options for the development of your organizations Preparedness and Response Plan. Exposure risk categories and workers who may fall within them are: 

Very high: Jobs with a high potential for exposure to known or suspected sources of COVID-19 during specific medical, postmortem, or laboratory procedures. 
Workers Include: Healthcare and morgue workers performing aerosol-generating procedures on or collecting/handling specimens from potentially infectious patients or bodies of people known to have, or suspected of having, COVID-19 at the time of death. 

High: Jobs with a high potential for exposure to known or suspected sources of COVID-19. Workers Include: Healthcare delivery, healthcare support, medical transport, and mortuary workers exposed to known or suspected COVID-19 patients or bodies of people known to have, or suspected of having, COVID19 at the time of death. 

Medium: Jobs that require frequent/close contact with people, but who are not known or suspected patients. Workers Include: Those who may have contact with the general public (e.g., schools, high-population density work environments, some high-volume retail settings), including individuals returning from locations with widespread COVID-19 transmission 

Low: Jobs that do not require contact with people known to be or suspected of being infected. Workers in this category have minimal occupational contact with the public and other coworkers, (e.g.) remote workers, office workers, manufacturing and industrial facility workers who do not have frequent close contact with coworkers, customers, or the public). 

The guidelines in Section 2 are required on an industry specific basis per the State of Michigan. It will be up to your organization to determine if the language matches the steps that appropriately address the response to COVID-19 or if more stringent steps need to be implemented. 

Legal Disclaimer: 

The information contained in the documents does not constitute legal advice and should not be applied arbitrarily to other businesses or workplaces. Axios HR bears no responsibility with respect to third party reliance on the recommendations set out herein. All employers should consult with local legal counsel, medical as well as health & safety advisors specific to their jurisdiction and industry in developing strategies applicable to their unique workplaces.

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